Sunday, January 18, 2009

a...aa...i....ii...

Namaste, Stella here from Parties, Sarees and Melodies. I just began my Hindi classes last week. Presently, here is what I know how to write ... yeah, it's only the alphabet but it's where everyone has to start.




I posted a picture of my writing, so if anyone finds that a letter isn't well written, just tell me whats weird about in a comment box, Thanks


Great to see that many bloggers are interested is the Hindi language as well. Thanks for having me.

My Status: (Week 2) With the alphabet I can read and speak the letters (doesn't mean I pronounce them well) and I can maybe say and read a word but I won't know what that word means.

8 comments:

Beth said...

I've had that feeling in the other languages I've studied, but I noticed it so much more strongly in Hindi, I think because reading the word - just recognizing the sounds and putting them together - was such effort that I could hardly believe I had done all that work and still didn't know what it meant.

Siddharth said...

Excellent handwriting!

The only problem I see is with "na(न)" and "ma(म)". That curve should be more prominent. It could be more visible, I think.

This google tool might be useful in your studies.

http://www.google.com/transliterate/indic/Hindi

(If you don't know about it already)

Anonymous said...

WELL THERE ARE MOTAHN 40 ALPHABATE IN HINDI AND MANY SUB ALPHABATES. WELL I AM ORIYA AND THERE IS AROUND 70 TO 80% SIMILARITY BETWEEN ORIYA AND HINDI. SO I CAN READ AND WRITE HINDI BUT IF U ASK ME TO WRIOTE ALL THE ALPHABATES THEN ITS IMPOSSIBLE. THE DAY WE GET INTO HIGHSCHOOL WE FORGET THE THE ORDER( SO MANY ALPHABATES ARE THERE)... SO IF YOU MISS SOME OF THEM DONT WORRY.

TheQuark said...

Nice handwriting :)
Formations are correct. In the first line 7th alphabet should come at the end.

and the alphabet at the last line should be the 4th alphabet of second last line. This is important because Devanagari alphabets are arranged as tables with alphabets in a row have slight variation of the kind of sound you make while speak them.
Notice that if you know the pronunciations.

(It also makes memorization easy. Just remember the first alphabets of each row: क च ट त प य श the rest will follow by remembering sounds)

TheQuark said...

http://translate.google.com/ has option for Hindi and Firefox has this cool translation extension:

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/918

this uses google translation service. Just select text you want to translate and chose language settings (I choose German to be translated to English), saves a lot of clicks and key presses

Richard S. said...

Hi, Stella_1. I found this blog through your Blogger profile, which I visited today via my blog's stats. I think this blog will be useful to me as well, since I have also been taking steps to learn a little Hindi (which should be no surprise :) ....

Hello to Beth too. And I see some other familiar names connected to this blog - PPCC, to start...

By the way, here in NYC, I found out that the Indian Consulate offers pretty cheap beginners' Hindi courses (in collaboration with some other group), only about $150. I missed the deadline for one that began in late April, but I will check back with them in the near future. (In my present situation, I am reluctant to spend money on any courses, but this looks like a good deal.)

Ness said...

I just started teaching myself Hindi (armed with Snell!) because of my obsession with Bollywood and all things Indian. Am so excited to stumble across this site so I can see that it IS possible (right now just being able to write the characters even remotely how they should look is an achievement)!

Stella_1 said...

hey, we should start updating on our hindi learning again!